Apparent Power Converter

Apparent Power Converter Online

Apparent Power is the Total Power Flowing

When electrical power in an AC system flows to a load (a computer, motor, lighting, cooling, etc.), some of the power is not absorbed and used to perform useful work – a portion of the power is reflected back to the power source (the electrical company). There are two ways to determine the total power flowing into a motor - one is by measuring the current and voltage, and another is by measuring the product of the voltage and current ( An example of this would be if you measured 208 volts and 5 amps; the apparent power is then 1040VA.

Apparent power is the outcome of voltage and current on an electrical circuit and is the vector sum of real and reactive power.

The connections that represent power in single and three-phase power circuits are outlined below:

Active Power

Definition: The real power used in an AC circuit is called true power or active power or real power. It is measured in kilowatt (kW) or megawatt (MW). It is the actual outcome of the electrical system which runs the electric circuits or load.

Reactive Power

Definition: The power which flows back and forth which means it moves in both directions in the circuit or reacts upon itself, is called reactive power. Reactive power is measured in kilo volt-ampere reactive (kVAR) or MVAR.

Apparent power

Apparent power is a measure of AC electrical power that is calculated by multiplying the RMS current by the RMS voltage. In DC circuits, or in AC circuits that have no impedance (a pure resistance), the voltage and current are in phase. If the two are equal, then the following formula holds:


P = ErmsIrms

where P is the power in watts, Erms is the root-mean-square (RMS) voltage in volts, and Irms is the RMS current in amperes. In an AC circuit, the voltage and current are not always in phase. The more you practice, the more complicated it becomes to determine power.

In an AC circuit, the product of the RMS voltage and the RMS current is called apparent power. An impedance of one megohm is the same as a resistance of one volt per amp, so the apparent power is That's right. When the real power is less than the apparent power, we say the resistance is greater than the true power. The vector difference between the apparent and true power is called reactive power.

In an AC circuit, the product of the RMS voltage and the RMS current is called apparent power. When the impedance is a pure resistance, the apparent power is the same as the true power. But when reactance exists, the apparent power is greater than the true power. The vector difference between the apparent and true power is called reactive power.

If Pa describes the apparent power in a complicated AC circuit, Pt describes the actual energy, and Pr describes the reactive power, then the following equation maintains:

Pa2 = Pt2 + Pr2


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